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Dog Loving Activities

Your best friend will feel like they died and went to doggy heaven when they take that first sniff of fresh mountain air.  There is so much for you and your four legged family members to do in Sunriver that there is no excuse for them to be left out of the fun. 

Bike with Your Pooch

• Rent a bike trailer from Sunriver's Village Bike & Ski and enjoy Sunriver's most popular activity with your buddy in tow.

► Insider Tips: 

Off-Leash Fun

• Bennington Proprties Dog Park and Dog Wash.

Bend Dog Parks and Mt Bachelor Dog Park.

• Sunriver's 30+ miles of paved pathways are perfect for you and your best friend.  You will never have to walk the same way twice.  A particular scenic area to walk is along the Deschutes River.

• Enjoy an off-leash hike with your pooch on the many National Forest roads and trails accessible by crossing Cardinal Landing foot bridge in Sunriver or on the Good Dog! Trail just outside of Bend.

► Insider Tips: Dogs are allowed off-leash on most trails set aside for mountain biking in the Deschutes National Forest and while playing "river fetch" even along restricted trails.  Dogs are allowed off leash in Sunriver as long as they are under voice command. The Sunriver Owners Association asks that you please carry a leash at all times.

Local Events

• Yappy Hour with Bennington Properties every summer.  Enjoy complimentary beer, wine, soda, snacks and ice cream while your best friend runs free and plays with other dogs in our off leash recreation area. 

• The Sunriver Brewing Company K9 Keg Pull is the premier event for the Sunriver “Chill Out”.

• The Old Fashioned July 4th Celebration & Pet Parade.  If you are looking for a special way to celebrate July 4th, start the day with Bend's most historical event, the Pet Parade, where children of all ages bring their special pet (we've seen dogs - large & small, llamas, horses, lizards, goats, and lots of stuffed animals) to parade through downtown Bend. It's one of the most unique parades you'll ever see!

• The American Cancer Society Bark For Life is a noncompetitive walk event for dogs and their owners to raise funds and awareness for the American Cancer Society's fight against cancer.

► Insider Tips: Coming Soon!

Winter Fun With Fido

• Cross-country skiing and snow shoeing with your dog can be a lot of fun.

• Oregon's first dog-friendly groomed ski/snowshoe trail. Located at elevation 5,500 feet the Wanoga Sno-Park is a fifteen minute drive from Sunriver on Century Drive.

• Skijoring ~ It feels like cross-country skiing with superpowers. Skijoring is cross-country skiing while being pulled by your dog.

► Insider Tips: Coming Soon!

Things to Bring For Your Dog

1. Pack a flashlight for nighttime nature calls (it gets very dark at night in Sunriver).

2. Pack towels to dry your dog off and a bed sheet to cover furniture.

3. Bring an extra few days worth of dog food in case your trip takes longer than expected.

4. Bring a portable kennel with you to keep your dog safe while in a new environment. Even the most well behaved dogs will behave differently when in a home they are not familiar with. Please take responsibility for any damage that your dog may cause. The most common damage caused by our dog guests is scratched wood work. When a dog is left in a room unattended; they will scratch the door wanting to get in or out.

5. In case of emergency bring your vet’s contact information and your dog’s vaccination records. Anticipate the possibility that your dog may get lost and bring along a photo.

6. Sunriver Leash Laws: (from the Sunriver Rules and Regulations) "Dogs shall not be permitted to run loose or unattended. Dogs shall be on a leash, confined to their owner's property, or under effective voice control. Persons walking dogs shall have a leash in their possession at all times."

Keep Your Dog Safe In Sunriver

1. Check ahead.  Prior to your trip, make sure dogs are allowed on the trail. Dogs are not allowed on National Park or National Monument Trails. Review applicable leash laws for the area, as well as any special city ordinances regarding dogs.

2. Condition your dog. Choose a trail that meets the fitness level of you and your dog.

3. Prepare for an emergency. Check your dog’s shots records and ensure that they are up to date. Be sure identification tags are well attached to your dog’s collar in case they wander into unknown territory.

4. Things to look out for: Dogs that wander off; Hunters during hunting season; Physical Exhaustion; Heat Exhaustion (download a copy of Ruff Wear's Guide to Animal Emergencies); Hypothermia; Hurt or cut paws from sharp rocks and terrain; Torn paw pads from excessive exercise; Fleas, ticks and other parasites; Embedded plant life in dog fur such as stinging nettles, foxtails and cheatgrass.

5. Keep your dog cool and hydrated. Don’t forget to protect against overheating, even if it’s cold outside. Since dogs exhume heat through their mouths and paws, it is necessary to occasionally remove the paws from the boots and allow them to breathe, even in cool weather. This will also give you the opportunity to check for abrasion and sore spots on the feet.

6. Prevent hypothermia and frostbite. It is important to remember that dogs can get hypothermia. Winter weather protection is especially important for dogs with short, thin coats such as Boxers and Greyhounds. Prevent frostbite by covering susceptible areas such as the paws with dog boots.

7. Make your dog visible. If you are headed out with your dog during hunting season, be sure to arm him with visibility.

8. Be wary of parasites.  Always cloak your dog with a guard against fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and other parasites that carry illness and cause discomfort for your dog.

9. Protect against paw injuries. Dog boots can prevent a variety of injuries from the surfaces we walk and run on, on the trail or in urban environments. Trail running and walking is hard on all feet—rocks, roots, mud, snow or ice can be torturous. Generally, dogs' paws become conditioned to run on familiar surfaces after a few weeks, but new terrain and changing environmental conditions can cause stone bruising, cuts and blistered pads.

10. Be on the lookout for Cheatgrass, a potentially dangerous weed common in Central Oregon. It is commonly confused with another dangerous weed, the foxtail. The danger lies in the "invasiveness" of the dry seed pods found in late summer and early fall. These pods have one-way microscopic barbs that allow the seed to work its way into fur, skin, and mucous membranes, but not work itself back out, much like the one-way movement of porcupine quills. Foxtail weeds shed very small black seeds which also work their way into fur, skin, and tissue. These annoying and troublesome weeds have been found in the skin (i.e. between the toes), eyes, ears, mouth, vulva and even interior body cavities such as lungs and abdomen, causing sometimes very serious punctures and infections. It is important not to underestimate the potential seriousness of this common problem.

11. Sunriver Veterinary Clinics.  Sunriver has an excellent veterinary clinic located in the Sunriver Business Park. Expect expert care combined with compassion and friendship. I have seen many vets in my lifetime and the veterinarians at the Sunriver Veterinary Clinic are some of the best. Very affordable and professional. Sunriver Veterinary Clinic. 541.593.8128. Open 8:30 to 5:00 Monday through Friday.

For afterhours or weekend emergencies, contact the Animal Emergency Center in Bend (Website). 541.385.9110

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